Olivier Moly photographer, dreamer, adventurer…

Archive for ‘December, 2012’

20121226_0205To see all of the pictures click on the picture above.

To follow my route follow this link.

Wouhou ! I did 44 kilometres today, I don’t have anything interesting to tell. The path was just sealed road. Feel like I’m getting really close to Auckland, people are not so different but you feel weird walking with your big backpack through cities.
After 30 kilometers, I was really tired and got lost, I left by inadvertence the path and went straight ahead on farm lands. Dogs were barking at me everywhere.
Arrived at Mangawhai Heads I met some nice people who offered me to stay at their place but I wanted stupidly to get further up on the path, so I did say no… On my way to the campsite, I met Luke one of Simon’s son, he offered me to stay at his place but I said no again… Such a mistake…
The night is coming and I can barely see anything, thankfully the street light help me to find my way, I’m exhausted. I get to the campground, it’s ten pm and I can’t stay stand up. I think I’m going to take a day off.

Wouhou ! J’ai fait pas moins de 44 kilomètres aujourd’hui, mais je n’ai malheureusement pas grand chose à raconter. Le chemin est assez lassant, toutes ces routes goudronnées que j’empruntent ne sont pas réellement agréable et ne me laissent que peu d’inspiration photographique. Le fait de se rapprocher d’Auckland la plus grande ville de Nouvelle-Zélande, y est je pense pour quelque chose. Les gens ne sont pas vraiment différents, mais toutes ces villes sont pleines de maison de vacances vide donnant une ambiance pour le moins sinistre. Le fait de traverser toutes ces villes avec mon gros sacs, intrigue les gens. C’est assez bizarre pour moi, je préférerais être en pleine montagne, je ne me sens pas à ma place. Un peu comme aller à la plage avec ses affaires de ski… Vous voyez l’idée…
Pour l’histoire, après 30 kilomètres de marche, je me suis perdu sur le sentier, la fatigue certainement. Je me suis retrouvé a traverser barrières et fermes.
Une fois arrivé sur Mangawhai, prononcé en Maori “Mangafaï et par les anglais “Mangawé” ce qui porte parfois à confusion, j’ai rencontré de nombreuses personnes voulant m’héberger ou me permettant de planter ma tente dans leur jardin, j’ai été stupide de ne pas avoir accepté. Je rencontre un peu plus loin Luke le fils de Simon qui m’a hébergé chez lui à Pataua, il me propose de dormir chez ses amis, mais il faut que je continue je ne suis plus qu’à une dizaine de kilomètres du camping de Mangawhai. la nuit commence à tomber, et malgré la lumière des lampadaire, j’ai un peu de difficulté à me repérer. J’arrive exténué au camping, il est dix heure du soir et par chance il est encore ouvert. Je plante ma tente, demain sera mon jour de repos bien mérité, un jour de vacance blog et photo.

Leave a comment

20121225_0053To see all of the pictures click on the picture above.

To follow my route follow this link.

Chris, Carole and I took a breakfast, then we went to this tiny church in Whangarei Heads built in 1858. It was really funny, never seen that, all of the children where sitting on the front opening gifts, participating and eating candies. Really good vibes, it was great to enjoy this moment in this atmosphere, you can feel the christmas spirit.
After a lavish lunch, Chris took out the Sealegs from the shed to help me crossing the estuary. The monster, it’s an amphibious boat made in New Zealand, it has got three wheels driven by a joystick. You should see that it can go everywhere. After crossing, I said goodbye to Chris and keep walking on the path.
This day wasn’t great, the weather still bad wasn’t really motivating and I got beacause the high tide again forcing myself to take a 10 kilometres bypass via a sealed road, the landscape wasn’t really beautiful, holiday houses and streets empty…
I finally ended in Ruakaka campground, tired and not really happy about my progress but I had good time on the morning which is a beautiful christmas gift.

L’heure du petit déjeuner, Carole, Chris et moi le prenons ensemble avant de partir à la messe de Noël. Ils ne sont pas vraiment croyant mais y vont pour ce mettre dans l’esprit de Noël. Je les suis, c’était une promesse que j’ai faite hier à Carole.
La messe est phénoménale, nous sommes bien une bonne trentaine dans cette minuscule bâtisse. Tout le monde participe, les enfants dévorent les bonbons qui décorent le sapin. Nous avons le droit à la récitation d’un passage de la bible australienne, tellement drôle. Vous auriez du être là mes amis, c’est ça l’esprit de Noël.
De retour à la maison sous la pluie, toujours, Chris sort la machine de guerre qui nous servira à traverser l’estuaire. Un Sealegs, un bateau amphibie, il est munie de trois roues pilotées par un poste de commande indépendant qui lui permet d’aller aussi bien sur terre que sur mer.
Le temps de dire au revoir à Carole et nous partons. Le temps n’est pas tellement clément et les vagues m’obligent à m’accrocher à mes baskets. Je dis au revoir à Chris sur la marina puis rejoints le chemin quelques kilomètres plus loin. Je marche sur la plage pour atteindre un autre estuaire qui se franchi soit disant à pied, non pas celui-ci, la marée haute m’empêche d’aller plus loin et me force de contourner la rivière pour rejoindre un pont. Fatigué et peu fier de mon exploit, je m’arrête dans le camping de l’autre côté de l’estuaire.
Je pense faire mieux demain, ce n’est que partie remise. J’ai au moins eu un magnifique Noël et c’est un super cadeau.

3 Comments

20121224_0104To see all of the pictures click on the picture above.

To follow my route follow this link.

Simon made a delicious breakfast this morning, white baits fried. I pack my stuff and say goodbye, I’m pretty sure I will see these guys again. It’s hard to leave every time a warm place with really nice people, you just don’t want go, you want stay here and enjoy and there is so much to be seen around. But I have to walk, and if I stop in every town two days it’s going to take me ages to go to Bluff.
I’m heading off, crossing the foot bridge and going to Taiharuru Estuary. I have to cross this estuary by low tide, thankfully this time it is low tide. I walk on the edge of the mangrove, it is so interesting how these trees can grow up in salt water.
I was crossing the last difficulty to reach the other edge, when I hear someone. A man was coming in my direction from a deck in the mangrove. He offers me to come home and have a coffee to wait for the lowest tide like that I could cross easily. I said yes and follow him through the mangrove, we reach a beautiful garden with a hidden house in the bush, this was heaven. Ros and Hugh are running the Tide Song Bed & Breakfast (www.stay@tidesong.co.nz) here and know really well about Te Araroa, I’m not the first one coming here but I feel really blessed.
Back on the path, I cross the estuary without any problems and head to Kauri Mount. The fog is surrounding me and it’s really difficult to see something. A bit upset by the weather, I keep walking, apparently it’s the tail of the cyclone Even touching New-Zealand it’s going to be pouring down for three-four days. The walk on Ocean beach is mysterious, the fog give a strange perception of the landscape and distances.
A blue penguin, get dropped by the sea on my feet. He is still alive, he must be exhausted, the ocean is raging and really violent. I don’t really know what to do, I try to take it in my hands see if I can drop it in a calm spot on the sea, but this small thing is not really ready to travel in my backpack. A guy pass over and stop, it’s first one he found on this beach, he dig a hole in the sand to protect him against wind and leave it here. I hope it’s going to rest and go back to the sea but I doubt so.
I’m feeling really exhausted and I have to go to Whangarei Heads tonight to find a way to cross on the other side by boat. The mountains where the path is going are in the fog and I take the decision to take a bypass home made by the road. The guy who I met on the beach stop over to pick me up, I accept, I’m wet and I think it will be difficult to reach Mcleod Bay before night time. I finally arrive, on the bay where nothing is open and no one is here. I turn around the place, looking for a place to pitch my tent. Totally wet, I pass front of a beautiful house with two people inside waving at me, I ask them if they can tell me about accommodation. After a reflexion together and seeing me soaking in my clothes, they offer me to stay at their place and gave me a bed in private place in their garden, isn’t it Christmas spirit. Carole and Chris, they laugh a lot about the situation, me wet, waiting on the door. They cooked a turkey for dinner and offer me to share their dinner. I’m in heaven again, we share beautiful conversations and they tell me that they are going to help me tomorrow.

Simon a préparé un magnifique déjeuner, ce sont de minuscules poissons frits, c’est excellent. Je prépare mon sac et leur dit au revoir, j’ai la sensation que je les croiserais à nouveau sur ma route. Ce n’est jamais simple de quitter des gens agréables, si je m’écoutais je resterais quelques jours pour profiter des endroits magnifiques à découvrir. Mais j’ai un long chemin à parcourir et si je continue comme ça il va me falloir des années avant d’atteindre Bluff.
Je quitte donc leur maison et emprunte la passerelle piétonne qui franchi le bras de mer pour me diriger vers l’estuaire de Taiharuru. Je dois le traverser à pied et pour cela attendre la marée basse. L’endroit est magnifique, bien que le brouillard m’empêche de profiter entièrement du paysage, il donne au décor quelque chose de mystérieux. Je longe la mangrove tentant de rester sur le sable dur, mais m’enfonce parfois dans la vase jusqu’au  genoux.
Je m’apprête enfin à passer la dernière difficulté pour rejoindre l’autre rive, lorsque j’entend quelqu’un crier, il se dirige vers moi descendant un ponton dans la mangrove. Je pars à sa rencontre. Il me propose d’attendre que la marée soit au point le plus bas et d’en profiter pour prendre un café chez lui, pourquoi pas… Je le suis à travers la mangrove et nous atteignons un magnifique jardin puis prenons un sentier qui nous mène sur le pas d’une maison complètement camouflé dans la végétation. Hugh et Ros m’accueillent à bras ouvert et m’offrent café et petites tartelettes. Ils tiennent le Tide Song Bed & Breakfast (www.stay@tidesong.co.nz)
De retour sur le chemin, je traverse l’estuaire sans trop de peine et me dirige vers le mont Kauri. Celui-ci est complètement dans le brouillard, je suis un peu déçu par la météo , mais ne peux y faire grand chose. C’est apparemment la queue du cyclone qui arrive sur la cote Nord-Est de la Nouvelle- Zélande, ce qui laisse prédire quelques jours de mauvais temps.
J’atteint enfin Ocean Beach, le brouillard donne un côté mystérieux au panorama.
Un manchots bleu, s’effondre contre mes pieds épuisé d’affronter l’océan déchainer. Je tente de le prendre avec moi pour le déposer dans un coin où la mer sera plus calme, mais il n’a pas l’air prêt à marcher avec moi. Un homme passant par là m’explique qu’ils sont nombreux échoués sur la plage et ils vont probablement mourir d’épuisement ou bien mangés par les mouettes. Nous creusons tout de même une sorte de nid dans le sable pour le protéger du vent.
Je dois trouver un moyen de traverser l’estuaire à Whangarei Heads et il me reste un long chemin devant moi. Les montagnes face à moi sont dans le brouillard total et je décide de ne pas suivre le sentier passant parcelle-ci, mais de prendre un raccourci  par la route. Une voiture s’arrête, l’homme que j’ai rencontré sur la plage me propose de me déposer. La fatigue aidant j’accepte, il me dépose à Whangarei Heads. Ce village est désert, il pleut des cordes et je commence à désespérer de trouver un endroit pour dormir. Je passe devant une maison, deux personnes assises sur un canapé me font un signe de la main. Je tente le tout pour le tout et leur demande si ils connaissent un endroit où je puisse planter ma tente. Ni d’une ni deux, en me voyant trempé jusqu’à l’os, il m’offre de rester dans un petit appartement privé dans leur jardin, quel bonheur moi qui pensais planter la tente sous la pluie. Carole et Chris sont ici en vacance et sont seuls pour le 24 ils m’invitent donc à partager la dinde de Noël et m’assure qu’ils m’aideront à traverser l’estuaire demain.

2 Comments

20121223_0037To see all of the pictures click on the picture above.

To follow my route follow this link.

It’s nice to wake up in a warm place and have a nice breakfast. Dave & Lise bring me to Hilton & Melva’s place, we have to meet them at 9 am. They own a beautiful Bed & Breakfast 3 kilometres farther from Ngunguru. I help Hilton putting the dinghy on the car and say goodbye to everyone. Hilton gave me the GPS track via mail not to get lost on my way because this path is not on the Te Araroa track.
Hilton is a really tall guy and used to walk bare feet wherever, he tows by himself the boat to the water and we cross the estuary… It’s really unusual to be with my big backpack on a little boat.
Before saying me goodbye Hilton shows me the start of the track, then I’m heading by myself. It’s a rainy day but I had a lot of fun this morning crossing this estuary.
After a long walk on sealed road I finally ended in Pataua. After asking to some people if there is a way to pitch my tent for free in this town I come out in a house full of people. Simon the father of this family, welcome me so well. He offers me to stay for the night in his garden and offer me beer. I was so uncomfortable, because I was totally wet and stinky.
Lynette, Simon’s wife, forced me to stay inside and sleep on a couch and wash all of my clothes and dry them up. Nena the grandmother made us a delicious dinner. I had nice chat with all of them Luke, Eliot and Max are working in their father’s company. All of them are in holiday for Christmas. They tried to help all night to plan the next place I will be staying and try to find me a roof.
I had a really nice night, this family is awesome and now I’m sure that’s the kiwi way.

C’est agréable de se réveiller dans un bon lit, être au sec et prendre un vrai petit déjeuner.
Dave et Lise m’amène chez Melva et Hilton. Ils ont un gite d’hôte 3 kilomètres après Ngunguru. J’aide Hilton à charger le bateau sur la voiture et nous vérifions la route que je dois prendre sur le GPS, puisque ce chemin ne fait pas vraiment parti de la Te Araroa. Hilton est un de ces grands gars, il n’est plus vraiment tout jeune et transporte le bateau lui même et le met à l’eau. Nous traversons l’estuaire sans encombre, je ne fait pas vraiment le malin avec mon sac à dos rempli de matériel photographique sur ce petit bateau.
Avant de reprendre la mer, Hilton m’accompagne sur le départ du chemin pour que je ne m’égare pas. Il pleut, mais cette petite aventure me donne le sourire. Après une longue marche sur une route. J’arrive finalement à Pataua. Je me renseigne sur un moyen de planter ma tente gratuitement mais les gens sont pour la plupart étrangers à ce village et sont là en vacances. J’atterris finalement sur le pas d’une porte où les gens ont l’air de faire la fête en famille. je me sens assez gêner, mais n’ai pas vraiment de solution. Simon le père de famille m’accueille chaleureusement et m’offre une bière et m’autorise à planter la tente dans le jardin. Lynette me force à dormir sur le sofa et lave chacune de mes affaires, je ne dois pas vraiment sentir la rose.
Nena la grand-mère nous prépare un magnifique souper. Et j’en profite pour discuter avec les fils de Simon et Lynette. Luke, Elliott et Max, tout trois travaillent avec Simon dans l’entreprise familiale à Auckland, ils sont tous en vacances pour Noël. Ils essayent de m’aider toute la soirée pour trouver des gens qui puissent m’héberger sur le chemin.
Ils sont vraiment adorable, je me sens vraiment chanceux ces derniers temps.

1 Comment

20121222_0100To see all of the pictures click on the picture above.

To follow my route follow this link.

I wake up early, the light is beautiful. I’m walking, sun front of me, giving to my picture a radiant back light. I cross the way of a bunch of little pigs being afraid and running everywhere. First stop Whananaki, the town is empty, no one outside. Waiting for the shop opening, I enjoy this time to dry my tent, socks and shoes and doing some laundry.
After my tent has been dried, I left, taking the longest foot bridge in the south hemisphere (that what they say…) I take a splendid coastal walk, going along the sandy bay, the océan is raging, the waves are breaking on the rocks so roughly.
I’m done with the coastal walk, again sealed road, breaking my knees. The sun is getting hot, walking start to be a pain. I cross some houses, in one of them, people are partying before christmas, they laugh at me when passing by. My heavy backpack, maybe… or the fact that I’m dressed up like a post apocalyptic survivor, maybe… I hear a guy behind shouting at me, turning around, I star at this fellow running toward me dressed with Hawaiian towel and a beer in his hand. “It’s damn hot today, I think you need a drink!” i was speechless, the guy came home while I was holding my beer. “Thanks, you are awesome” I said.
The path is now leaving the shore and going up on a gumtrees and pine trees forest. On my way I meet a couple Lise and Dave, so kind they offer me to ask their friends in Ngunguru to help me crossing the estuary, I give them my number, will see.
I meet an other person, Tane Moana, this young Kauri some hundreds years is so huge, more than 3 metres diameters.
Blisters, they starting to hurt me, two, on the same foot…I reach Ngunguru with difficulties but I made it. I ask some people in a shop how to cross the estuary but they know nothing about it, there is no campground… My phone ring, Lise & Dave, they’re coming to pick me up and arranged with Hilton to drop me on the other edge with a boat tomorrow morning.
They drive me at their house, a beautiful house, with an amazing look out on the Whangaumu Bay. The sun is setting and Lise shows me every little secret places around.
They are amazing, more than giving me shower, laundry and a bed, they just open their arms and invite me to share beautiful conversations, cheese and wine without knowing me. As say Lise “That’s New-Zealand”…
Tomorrow we have to meet Hilton & Melva they are going to take me over the estuary , avoiding me 20 kilometres via bypass on sealed road.

Je me réveille tôt ce matin, la lumière est magnifique. Je marche, le soleil face à moi, le contre-jour modèle et texture le paysage, j’en profite donc pour faire quelques photos.
Je croise le chemin d’une flopée de petits cochons courant dans tout les sens effrayés par mes pas de géant. Je m’arrête à Whananaki, le village est vide. Le temps que l’épicerie ouvre, j’en profite pour faire sécher ma tente, mes chaussettes et mes chaussures et laver quelques affaires. Ma tente sèche, j’emprunte la plus longue passerelle piétonne dans l’hémisphère Sud, je ne suis pas sur que ce soit avéré mais bon…
Je suis, maintenant, un magnifique chemin longeant Sandy Bay, l’océan est déchainé, les vagues viennent se casser sur les rochers dans un vacarme assourdissant.
A nouveau de la route goudronnée, le soleil commence à taper et marcher commence à devenir sacrément difficile. Passant devant une maison pleine de monde, j’entend qu’ils rient à mon passage, peut être mon sac ou ma dégaine de Mad Max tout droit sorti d’un film Post-Apocalyptique. J’entend tout à coup quelqu’un qui m’appelle, je me retourne et voit ce gars en paréo Hawaïen courant une bière à la main. Il me l’offre en me disant qu’il fait trop chaud pour marcher et que j’ai besoin d’un rafraichissement. Je le remercie ne sachant pas vraiment quoi dire tellement je suis surpris.
Le chemin quitte le bord de mer se dirigeant vers une forêt d’eucalyptus et de pins. Je rencontre sur le chemin un couple Lise et Dave vraiment adorable, ils me proposent de m’aider à traverser l’estuaire de Ngunruru, je leur donne donc mon numéro et reprend mon chemin.
Sur le chemin je rencontre cette vieille personne, plus vieille que quiconque, Tane Moana il s’agit d’un Kauri, ces arbres qui peuvent atteindre 2000 ans, celui-ci ne fait que trois mètres de diamètres mais semble déjà immense.
J’atteint Ngunguru avec quelques difficultés, j’ai deux ampoules sur le même pied et c’est assez douloureux. Epuisé je me renseigne dans une épicerie pour savoir si il y a un moyen de traverser l’estuaire ou de planter ma tente pour la nuit, ils n’ont pas l’air au courant. Mon téléphone se met à sonner, c’est Lise and Dave, il m’offre de venir me chercher et de me loger pour la nuit dans leur maison.
Que ne fut pas ma surprise quand, j’ai découvert la maison planter sur une colline dominant Whangaumu Bay. La vue est extraordinaire. Lise en profite pour me montrer tout les coins secrets autour de la maison, le soleil couchant me rend dingue je cours partout sur la colline à la recherche de “la photo”.
Ce sont des personnes extraordinaires, nous passons notre soirée à discuter autour d’un verre de vin et du fromage, Dave a préparé un magnifique repas. J’ai rarement été accueilli comme ça. Comme dit Lise “ C’est ça la Nouvelle-Zélande”…
Ils ont même tout arrangé avec des amis aux parents de Lise pour me faire traverser l’estuaire, nous avons rendez-vous avec Hilton et Melva demain à 9 heure.

Leave a comment

20121221_0037To see all of the pictures click on the picture above.

To follow my route follow this link.

This morning is difficult, hard to get out of my sleeping bag. I know this day is going to be terrible as I have to walk a lot on sealed road. It’s starting, the asphalt get hot it’s a strain for my feet and knees. Anyway, the landscape is beautiful and I know I will in the forest soon.
After this 20 km along the road, I’m exhausted but I really want to cross this forest that is the land of a Maori Don Waetford, it’s private land, so I’m not allowed to picth my tent. Climbing sharply, this track kill myself bit per bit, tired I lead myself astray and take a wrong path. I don’t have any choice the night is coming, I check my GPS, I think I could make it. After following a fence doing down hill and trying to find a path between the fence and the bush, I get my feet wet in a muddy stream. Finally, I reach a road. I find a house with light, I don’t have anything to loose. I go through the gate and ask the owner if I can stay for the night in his garden. With a big smile, he answer me you can sleep everywhere on this land. I introduce myself and ask his name, he answer me “Don”.
Ironic, I run all day long not to sleep on his land and here I am asking if I could stay his garden.
He made me a beautiful coffee and we had a chat about maori’s culture and his roots.

Ce matin n’est pas des plus facile. J’ai du mal à sortir de mon duvet. Je suis conscient que cette journée va être longue et pénible puisque la majeure partie du chemin que je vais emprunter n’est qu’asphalte. Et voilà, ça commence, le goudron et déjà bouillant. Je sens mes pieds gonflés et cette sensation me draine toute mon énergie. Mais ça n’est pas si terrible, le paysage reste somptueux et me redonne le sourire, dans tout les cas je vais rapiddemment atteindre la fôrèt.
Après une vingtaine de kilomètre à parcourir les routes, je me sens épuisé. Mais je me dois de traverser cette fôrêt. Toutes ces terres appartiennent à un Maori du nom de Don Waetford, étant une propriété privée je ne peux pas planter ma tente où bon me semble, ce qui me pousse à continuer.
Le terrain est assez raide, et je n’arrête pas de me prendre de pleine face des toiles d’araignée, à cour d’énergie je me laisse dérouter sur un chemin semblant plus simple. Ce n’est que plus tard en vérifiant sur mon GPS que je réalise mon erreur. Il est trop tard pour faire demi-tour la nuit tombe déjà, je dois continuer. Ce chemin m’oblige à longer une barrière, frayant mon chemin entre des fils barbelés et une fôrét très dense. J’atteins alors une sorte mare boueuse que je traverse trampant mes chaussures. Enfin sur la route, heureux d’être finalement sur une bonne route goudronnée.
Sur ma route, je tombe sur une maison encore éclairé, je tente ma chance. Je rentre dans le jardin et un maori me reçoit avec un grand sourire il m’offre de rester pour la nuit dans son jardin. Je me présente et me donne son nom, vous ne devinerez jamais, ce gars qui m’offre si gentiment de dormir dans son jardin s’appelle Don. Je viens de passer trois bonnes heures à bout de souffle, courant pour ne pas dormir sur ses terres et voilà que je me retrouve à planter ma tente dans son jardin. Quelle ironie…
Il m’a fait un fabuleux café et a pris le temps de me raconter l’histoire de sa famille.

Leave a comment

20121220_0017To see all of the pictures click on the picture above.

To follow my route follow this link.

I wanted to wake up early but I lost my rythm during these five days hanging around in Waitangi. After passing the Buck father’s house, I hear a noise, a possum, it’s caught in a trap. Possums in New Zealand are pests they kill trees, they endemic from Australia and came with the first settlers. Buck told me that they use to hunt them for the skins, they get between 150 and 175 $ for one kilogrammes of skin approximately 50 skins. It’s kind of a sad story but they damaged the forest.
Russel forest is a paradise, the waikare river water is so clear, I just have to bend over to drink out of it. I follow it for seven kilometres getting my feet wet and sink into the forest, heading up to a mount.
Going down hill is easier and I join quickly Punakuku road. Following the Punakuku river I find a spot to pitch my tent under a Pūriri, a huge tree with red fruits like cherries.

Je voulais me réveiller plus tôt ce matin mais je pense avoir perdu mon rythme pendant ces cinq jours de farniente. En passant devant la maison du père de Buck, j’entend un bruit, c’est un possum, sa patte est prise dans un piège. Ce spectacle est assez triste, mais  ici en Nouvelle-Zélande le possum est reconnu comme étant une nuisance. Il dévaste arbres et oiseaux. Il fut importé par les premiers colons d’Australie. Buck m’a appris que les peaux de possums se vendent entre 150 et 175 dollars le kilo c’est à dire approximativement 50 peaux. Peut-être devrais je me mettre à chasser le possums…
La forêt de Russel est paradisiaque, la rivière Waikare est tellement claire, je n’ai juste qu’à me pencher pour boire. Je la suis pendant sept kilomètres, mouillant mes pieds une fois encore, puis je plonge dans la forêt, me dirigeant vers un sommet.
L’ascension n’est pas des plus simple et les chaussettes mouillées ne me facilite pas vraiment la tache, mais je pense qu’il va falloir que je m’habitue.
La descendante est bien plus simple et je rejoins rapidement la route de Punakuku. En suivant la rivière du même nom, je trouve non loin de la route un endroit pour planter ma tente sous un Pūriri, un arbre immense couvert de fruit rouge ressemblant à des cerises.

Leave a comment

20121219_0060

To see all of the pictures click on the picture above.

To follow my route follow this link.

I spend this last morning with my Welsh friends drinking our last tea together then I’m heading to Opua. Taking the path along the beach, the high tide force myself to take the road to reach Opua. It’s not really what I wanted to do, but I have to wait until the low tide at 4 pm or taking this bypass. The road is not really good for my feet and crossing cars is a bit scaring but I lost enough time like that.
In Opua marina, I ask how much is the water taxi to go to the waikare forest, it’s about one hundred dollars could you imagine just to do 7 kilometres. After asking some people about the best way to go there. I jump on the car ferry, it costs me one dollar. On the ferry I meet a really charming lady who offer me a ride to Russel unfortunately I’m going in the other way. I decide to hit the road walking, 25 kilometres.
It’s really hot and difficult walking close to the cars going at 100 km/h, stressful.
After 10 kilometres, a maori stop over me and offer me a lift. Julian, he knows the country really well, he takes me to the Waikare forest, such a luck.
After a little rest on the river, back on the path through the forest. I find a campsite where I meet a Maori Buck and a Samoan Shay. They together helping Buck’s father to build his house in the bush and building a campsite for the Te Araroa trail. I spend my night front of the fire talking with Buck. This young fellow as a lot of knowledges about trees and birds he taught me all night long how to recognize bird calls. We could hear the Morepork or Ruru a little owl native from New Zealand.

Je profite des derniers instants avec mes amis Gallois, prenant un dernier thé ensemble. Je pars ensuite pour Opua. La marée me force à quitter le chemin passant par la plage et m’obligeant à prendre la route. Ce n’est pas vraiment ce que je voulais, mais attendre la marée basse jusqu’à 4 heure ne fait pas vraiment parti de mes plans, j’ai perdu suffisamment de temps comme ça. La route n’est pas vraiment excellente pour mes pauvres pieds et croiser des voitures roulant à toute allure est pour le moins stressant.
Sur le port d’Opua, je demande quel est le moyen le moins cher d’accéder à la forêt de Waikare, ils me répondent que le bateau me coutera dans les 100 $ et le canoë environ le même prix. Je décide donc de prendre le ferry qui me coute seulement un dollar mais me demande de marcher environ 25 kilomètres sur une route goudronnée. Sur le ferry, je rencontre une dame charmante qui m’offre de m’amener sur Russel, je ne pars malheureusement pas dans cette direction. Je décide donc de marcher sur la route.
Après une dizaine de kilomètres, un maori s’arrête pour me proposer de me rapprocher, vous auriez vu mon sourire.
Il m’amène sur le point de départ du sentier. Sur la route, nous parlons de cette région qu’il connait par coeur. Julian est un de ces gars arpentant la région à la recherche de petits boulot, vivant de tout est de rien.
Nous discutons sur le bord d’une rivière, puis il reprend la route. Chemin faisant, je rencontre deux jeunes vivant en plein milieu de la forêt, Buck et Shay. Ils aident le père de Buck à construire une maison et un camping pour la Te Araroa. Je passe la soirée autour d’un feu discutant avec Buck. Tout les sujets y passent, et Buck connait très bien tout les arbres  et oiseaux vivant ici, il m’apprend à reconnaitre le cris du Morepork petite chouette native de Nouvelle-Zélande.

3 Comments

20121218_0039To see all of the pictures click on the picture above.

To follow my route follow this link.

My apologies everyone, I didn’t write or post anything for a simple reason I had several problems with my gear. It’s been four days now I’m waiting to solve it.
So I spent my time with Mike and Beca hanging around and having fun. I could rest and I think I needed it.
Problem now is solved so here we go tomorrow I’m heading off…

Je suis sincèrement désolé, je n’ai pu écrire ou poster ces derniers jours puisque je n’ai pas avancé d’un mètre. J’ai eu quelques problèmes avec mon matériel, rien de grave, mais ça m’a valu une attente de quatre jours à Waitangi.
Je ne regrette pas, j’ai pu me reposer et apprécier la compagnie de ces personnes charmantes Mike et Beca rencontrées sur le chemin.
Je viens de régler mon problème ce matin, je serais donc sur la route dès demain matin c’est à dire le mercredi 19.

Leave a comment

20121213_0015To see all of the pictures click on the picture above.

To follow my route follow this link.

My last breakfast at Woodland Motel, sausages, scrambled eggs, bacon and a coffee. What do you want more?
This place was amazing, lovely, nice and tidy. Tony and Wendy are great guests, really discreet and attentive to all of your need.
On my way out of Keri Keri I get stuck in a swamp I wanted to cross a river but the tide was high and I didn’t find the path it took one hour to find out that there is no way to cross the river I finally take a bypass by the road. I lost one hour and a bit of energy but doesn’t really matter i’m not here to run.
The path become really easy by a large forest road, crossing huge pine trees and swamps. Close to Waitangi I meet a couple in a campervan from Wales, they ask me about a campground against some water. Arrived at the Waitangi campground while I was pitching my tent, Mike this welsh guy, I met earlier offer me to join them for a beer. Why not?
I spent a beautiful night talking drinking wisky, beer, sharing my nougat, hunting possum, listening to Tuis (this odd bird doing R2D2 noises) and staring at the stars. Beca and Mike are two beautiful hearts, happy and funny. I had great time talking with them.

Mon dernier petit déjeuner au Woodland Motel, une assiette de saucisses, bacons, oeufs brouillés et un bon café. Que demande le peuple?
Cette endroit fut vraiment reposant et agréable. Wendy et Tony les propriétaires sont chaleureux et ont une manière exceptionnelle de vous accueillir.
À la sortie de la ville, le chemin m’oblige à m’aventurer dans une mangrove pour traverser une rivière. Je passe une bonne heure à trouver le moyen de traverser sans y parvenir. La marée étant haute je ne trouve aucun moyen et perd la trace du chemin ce qui me vaut de retourner sur mes pas pour emprunter la route récupérant ainsi le chemin quelques kilomètres plus loin. Ce détour me fait perdre une bonne heure de marche mais cela n’est pas bien grave, je ne suis plus à ça près.
Le chemin emprunte ensuite une route forestière bordant de jeunes pins, et marées. Le décor et somptueux.
En m’approchant de Waitangi je tombe sur un couple de Gallois qui ont perdu leur route. Ils sont à la recherche du camping de Waitangi. Je leur indique la direction en échange d’un peu d’eau. Arrivé à Waitangi, Mike à qui j’ai indiqué la route un plus tard me propose de les rejoindre lui et Beca pour boire une bière, vous auriez vu mes yeux à ce moment là une bière mon dieu que c’est bon, vous ne pouvez pas imaginer…
Je passe la soirée avec eux, discutant, buvant whisky et bière, chassant le possum (phalanger-renard) et regardant les étoiles à la recherche de la croix du Sud.
Un Tui oiseaux endémique de la Nouvelle-Zélande nous fait entendre son chant une sorte de sifflement mixer avec la voix de R2D2, c’est assez comique et étonnant.
Nous restons là des heures, profitant chacun de ce moment unique.

1 Comment